Tertiary reform in New Zealand: A knowledge society and a ‘new professionalism’

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Research and Development in Higher Education: Quality Conversations Vol. 25

July, 2002, 794 pages
Published by
Tony Herrington
ISBN
0 908557 54 X
Abstract 

Tertiary education in New Zealand has since the 1990’s been based on consumer choice with little regard to the resulting fragmentation. In 2000 the current Government established a Tertiary Education Advisory Commission (TEAC) to investigate and provide information of and to the tertiary sector. The tertiary sector embraces all institutions and other affiliations that provide post- compulsory schooling options. The resulting change in policy is being heralded as a completely new ‘paradigm’ where educative outcomes are connected to social, economic and cultural policy. The current Government has labelled the connection to broader policy considerations as essential in order for New Zealand to become a ‘knowledge society’. The tertiary sector will need to consider institutional identity in light of the ongoing changes and move towards a ‘knowledge society’. Academic staff will also need to reconsider their role and rather than perceive tertiary reforms as a ‘push-down’ agenda consider claiming a ‘new professional identity’.

Keywords: tertiary education, education policy, identity, scholarship of teaching

Tertiary reform in New Zealand: A knowledge society and a ‘new professionalism’

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