It takes more than breadcrumbs to learn generic skills: Collaborating to improve information literacy

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Research and Development in Higher Education: Learning for an Unknown Future Vol. 26

July, 2003, 692 pages
Published by
Helen Mathews and Rod McKay
ISBN
0 90 8557 55 8
Abstract 

The effective teaching and learning of generic skills is becoming an important component of undergraduate education with the introduction of graduate attribute programmes in some Australian universities. Research shows that contextualised learning of these skills is important, but is a discipline-specific context sufficient to ensure student success in acquiring these skills? This paper studies the effectiveness of information skills learning by a group of undergraduates using Brookfield’s concept of critical reflection and Critical Incident Questionnaire (CIQ). Most students reported positive experiences where the learning environment encouraged a deep approach to learning and negative experiences where that environment encouraged a surface approach. To ensure that students’ approach to learning is appropriate for achieving the level of information literacy required of graduates, the study recommends the integration of information skills learning into course curricula through the close collaboration of academic and library staff.

Keywords: graduate attributes; integration; information skills

It takes more than breadcrumbs to learn generic skills: Collaborating to improve information literacy

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Owen, S.