Teaching and Learning in the Technology Access Programme (TAP) at Tshwane University of Technology (TUT)

You are here

Research and Development in Higher Education: Enhancing Higher Education, Theory and Scholarship Vol. 30

July, 2007, 651 pages
Published by
Geoffrey Crisp & Margaret Hicks
ISBN
0 908557 72 8
Abstract 

Global competitiveness has become a reality, and can no longer be regarded as something that only affects other parts of the world. The shortage of highly trained graduates in fields such as science, engineering, technology and commerce, has been detrimental to South Africa’s social and economic development. One of the fundamental reasons is that an unacceptably high number of students who have engineering potential, lack the necessary knowledge and skills to complete an engineering degree, as stated by Nair (2002).

With this in mind, the Faculty of Engineering and the Built Environment at the Tshwane University of Technology (TUT) took bold steps to ensure that it meets the challenges of the future head-on. In 1999 the Faculty established a bridging programme, known as the Technology Access Programme (TAP). The aim of the programme is to address the critical areas that were identified as deficiencies among students who were enrolled for engineering degree courses in the past. Through this programme, applying innovative teaching and learning skills, students’ basic knowledge and skills are improved to an appropriate level for admission to degree courses within the Faculty. Students who have passed the programme are allowed to enroll for the engineering course of their choice.

Keywords: Teaching and learning, bridging course, engineering

Teaching and Learning in the Technology Access Programme (TAP) at Tshwane University of Technology (TUT)

pdf (194.65 KB)
Download
Viljoen, L.