A vertically integrated, embedded curriculum enhances the information literacy skills of science undergraduates

You are here

Research and Development in Higher Education: Enhancing Higher Education, Theory and Scholarship Vol. 30

July, 2007, 651 pages
Published by
Geoffrey Crisp & Margaret Hicks
ISBN
0 908557 72 8
Abstract 

Information literacy is often cited as a key graduate attribute. The literature strongly suggests that embedding information literacy into the curriculum is the most effective means of supporting student learning. Within this framework, academics and librarians must share responsibility for teaching information literacy. The School of Zoology has worked in partnership with the Science Library to devise an embedded, vertically integrated Information Literacy curriculum. We used a longitudinal survey to assess the development of information literacy skills by a cohort of Zoology students exposed to overt teaching and assessment of information literacy through the three years of their undergraduate degree. The survey instruments were designed to assess students’ skills and attitudes against the Australian and New Zealand Information Literacy Framework (ANZIL) Framework standards. Our results show that, in general, our students’ skills did increase significantly from year 1 to year 2, with a trend for a further increase from year 2 to year 3, although that increase was not significant. These results demonstrate that embedding information literacy within the science curriculum is an effective strategy for improving the generic skills of science graduates, and preparing them as life-long learners.

Keywords: graduate attributes, information literacy, longitudinal survey

A vertically integrated, embedded curriculum enhances the information literacy skills of science undergraduates

pdf (217.68 KB)
Download
Jones, S., Evans, C. & Magierowski, R.